Algarinejo

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Algarinejo is situated in the Montes Occidentales and sits at the foot of the Cerro del Calvario hill. The name comes from Arab word al-Garín (the caves). It is an agricultural village and most residents earn their livelihood from olive farming. A large part of the population lives in rural areas. The municipality, its geographical location and its way of life are ideal for both cultural and rural tourism. In some areas you can still see ancient crafts being practised such as cheese-making and salting and preserving foods. Here saddles and leather goods, wicker products, linen and blankets are made.

Fuentes de Cesna is just next to Algarinejo. It is located to the southwest of the town in the surrounding ​​hills and ravines. Its origin is remote and it is thought that in the 15th century it may have been a town of some importance, inhabited by Arabs active in the jewellery trade. In 1940 the old town, known as Las Fuentes Viejas, was battered by a heavy storm. Falling rocks killed many people and the town was practically destroyed.

In ancient times Algarinejo was a Roman settlement. Recent excavation of the archaeological site on Avenida de la Constitución has unearthed a lot of interesting evidence, such as the ruins of walls and floors of a building dating back to the Ibero-Roman era, as well as several graves that were part of an, as yet undated, cemetery.

The town had many caves that served as occasional refuges for local shepherds. The caves were known as al-Garín in Arabic, which gave the town its name. The caves were mentioned by Alfonso XI in his Libro de la Montería. After the Reconquista, Algarinejo fell under the jurisdiction of the Council of Loja. Later, in 1614, it was sold by Felipe III to Don Luis de Lison and Biedma, on whom the name of the town was bestowed in 1687.

Algarinejo’s cuisine has many Arab influences. The area is dry and chickpeas grow in abundance, as do cereals and olives used for oil. In the tough winters the inhabitants enjoy chickpea stew, and in the summer fresh garlic soup or trout. Courgette soup with noodles and catfish in green sauce is also hugely popular. Doughnuts and Palotes (strips of flour mixed with cinnamon, sugar, egg, and milk, and then fried) are also delicious. Fig bread is also a local speciality.

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Information about the Municipality

Region: Poniente Granadino
Postcode: 18280
Distance from Granada (km): 85
Number of inhabitants: 4184
People: Algarinenses
Web: www.algarinejo.es
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Ermita del Santo Cristo

Algarinejo

This chapel was built in the 18th century, where the Via Crucis ended. Starting from the parish church the Via Crucis passed by thirteen stations around the village and finally finished here. Inside there is a picture of the Holy [...]

Iglesia de Santa María la Mayor

Algarinejo

This church is situated in the centre of town and dates back to the late 18th century. It has three naves with corresponding chapels, a sacristy and a tower, all made of stone. It was built on the site of [...]

Torre Pesquera

Algarinejo

The Torre Pesquera was part of a series of defensive structures and is accessed by the road that leads from Zagra to Fuentes de Cesna. It was built on a promontory of the Río Pequesra near its confluence with the [...]

Centro de Interpretación del Hábitat Rural

Algarinejo

This visitor centre is part of the town’s tourist office. It provides a detailed picture of the countryside and rural life in the municipality.

Fiestas en honor a Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno

Algarinejo

Estos festejos son conocidos como la Feria Grande. Era la antigua fiesta real del ganado y todavía se sigue celebrando una exposición ganadera.

Celebration in honour of Santa Ana

Algarinejo

During the last weekend of July several religious act in honour of Santa Ana are celebrated, and they get complemented with other sport activities like tennis, football or bowls tournaments and trial and bicycle exhibitions. During these days you can [...]



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